Richard L. Stern, Esq.


Nassau Suffolk Law Services (NSLS) and the Suffolk Pro Bono Project are pleased to honor Nassau Suffolk Law Services (NSLS) and the Suffolk Pro Bono Project are pleased to honor Richard L. Stern of Macco & Stern, LLP as the Suffolk County Pro Bono Attorney of the Month. Mr. Stern has previously been honored with this distinction for his enduring leadership and assistance provided in the NSLS Bankruptcy Clinic. He also received the New York State Bar Association President=s Pro Bono Service Award in 1992 and again in 1996.Stern began his pro bono work with the Bankruptcy Clinic at its inception. He was one of the originators of the Clinic in 1990 which remains a thriving pro bono initiative to this day. The bi-monthly clinics are held at the Islandia offices of NSLS where a panel of volunteer attorneys meet with, screen, and evaluate the low income bankruptcy clients for pro bono representation. As the lead attorney, Stern is the backbone of the clinic and remains loyal to the initiative over the years insuring its continued operation. He also serves as mentor to law students and less experienced volunteer bankruptcy lawyers. Maria Dosso, Director of Communications and Volunteer Services credits him with a generous teaching spirit. “He is quick to agree to have students or volunteers attend the clinic to observe and learn. He also willingly offers his expertise and guidance to the Project’s staff on legal questions as well as valuable advice to other volunteer attorneys.”Rick Stern was an undergraduate at The Ohio State University, spent his junior year studying in England at the University of Surrey, and received his law degree from Hofstra School of Law in 1977. Having practiced bankruptcy law exclusively over the years, Mr. Stern is a partner in Macco & Stern, LLP of Melville and is a Chapter Seven Bankruptcy Trustee for the Eastern District of New York. A member of both the Suffolk County Bar Association and the New York State Bar Association, he formerly served as a chair of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Law Committee, and has been an active member of the Suffolk County Bar Pro Bono Foundation Board of Managers for many years.For Stern, the inspiration to give back to those in need comes from two places. One, the number of people in need is enormous and often growing, and two, “There but for the grace of God, that could have been me,” he says. Through the hours spent in the Bankruptcy Clinic and with the Suffolk County Bar Association Pro Bono Foundation, Stern found the reasons that everyone should volunteer their services. “Many of us never see the difficulties others have in their lives,” Stern said. He adds, “Witnessing these struggles is the greatest inspiration to do pro bono work, and the only thing holding people back is reluctance to step into the role. Just take the step."Stern, however, recognizes that the services currently provided remain a band-aid on a larger problem. “There are a lot of people in need,” he said, imploring others to make the leap and take on pro bono work. He adds, “There is great satisfaction in accomplishing something for needy people.”Independent of his own accomplishments, Mr. Stern routinely shifts the spotlight to other people doing pro bono work. The Suffolk County Bar Association, Stern said, is “unbelievable” in providing services to the indigent. Furthermore, he thinks that the NSLS Bankruptcy Clinic as a whole deserves the praise more than he or any other individual member.Given his continued commitment of assistance to those in need, he will undoubtedly be recognized again in the future. Being so dependable and conscientious, Richard L. Stern is an inspiration to the volunteer effort and it honors the Pro Bono Project to recognize Richard L. Stern as Pro Bono Attorney of the Month.By Alex Berkman, Esq. Volunteer of Macco & Stern, LLP as the Suffolk County Pro Bono Attorney of the Month. Mr. Stern has previously been honored with this distinction for his enduring leadership and assistance provided in the NSLS Bankruptcy Clinic. He also received the New York State Bar Association President=s Pro Bono Service Award in 1992 and again in 1996.

Stern began his pro bono work with the Bankruptcy Clinic at its inception. He was one of the originators of the Clinic in 1990 which remains a thriving pro bono initiative to this day. The bi-monthly clinics are held at the Islandia offices of NSLS where a panel of volunteer attorneys meet with, screen, and evaluate the low income bankruptcy clients for pro bono representation. As the lead attorney, Stern is the backbone of the clinic and remains loyal to the initiative over the years insuring its continued operation. He also serves as mentor to law students and less experienced volunteer bankruptcy lawyers. Maria Dosso, Director of Communications and Volunteer Services credits him with a generous teaching spirit. “He is quick to agree to have students or volunteers attend the clinic to observe and learn. He also willingly offers his expertise and guidance to the Project’s staff on legal questions as well as valuable advice to other volunteer attorneys.”

Rick Stern was an undergraduate at The Ohio State University, spent his junior year studying in England at the University of Surrey, and received his law degree from Hofstra School of Law in 1977. Having practiced bankruptcy law exclusively over the years, Mr. Stern is a partner in Macco & Stern, LLP of Melville and is a Chapter Seven Bankruptcy Trustee for the Eastern District of New York. A member of both the Suffolk County Bar Association and the New York State Bar Association, he formerly served as a chair of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Law Committee, and has been an active member of the Suffolk County Bar Pro Bono Foundation Board of Managers for many years. For Stern, the inspiration to give back to those in need comes from two places. One, the number of people in need is enormous and often growing, and two, “There but for the grace of God, that could have been me,” he says. Through the hours spent in the Bankruptcy Clinic and with the Suffolk County Bar Association Pro Bono Foundation, Stern found the reasons that everyone should volunteer their services. “Many of us never see the difficulties others have in their lives,” Stern said. He adds, “Witnessing these struggles is the greatest inspiration to do pro bono work, and the only thing holding people back is reluctance to step into the role. Just take the step." Stern, however, recognizes that the services currently provided remain a band-aid on a larger problem. “There are a lot of people in need,” he said, imploring others to make the leap and take on pro bono work. He adds, “There is great satisfaction in accomplishing something for needy people.” Independent of his own accomplishments, Mr. Stern routinely shifts the spotlight to other people doing pro bono work. The Suffolk County Bar Association, Stern said, is “unbelievable” in providing services to the indigent. Furthermore, he thinks that the NSLS Bankruptcy Clinic as a whole deserves the praise more than he or any other individual member. Given his continued commitment of assistance to those in need, he will undoubtedly be recognized again in the future. Being so dependable and conscientious, Richard L. Stern is an inspiration to the volunteer effort and it honors the Pro Bono Project to recognize Richard L. Stern as Pro Bono Attorney of the Month.

By Alex Berkman, Esq. Volunteer


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